Thom

Firstly, I loved the book. I've purchased several vehicle-dwelling books over the years but yours is by far my favorite. Firstly, it's packed with info. Secondly, it speaks directly to van dwellers, not those who, ahem, try to sleep in the trunk of their Oldsmobile and so on. The Internet resources you provide have made my purchase even more worthwhile!

Over the years, I've told several individuals about my idea and all have laughed it off. That said, when talking with more technical folks, the issue of condensation inside the van was brought up again and again. Over and over it was explained to me that I would wake up every morning to find everything covered with ice, or at least a dusting of frost, in colder climates.

Common sense tells me that I'd have to let my interior get incredibly cold in order for something like this to happen. In any event, in warmer climates this simply means it would get super humid inside, which, if I may say so myself, is something I'd like to avoid. With your one roof vent (and no windows, assuming you don't sleep with your front windows cracked), have you ever had any issues with condensation? If so, how did you handle it?

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journeyman

My wife and I have slept with our rabbit Bugsy in our Vanabode van JUST AS YOU SEE IT shown in the book in temperatures below 30 degrees without any problems other than it being cold when we get up to use the portable toilet in the middle of the night.

See the SLEEPING chapter on how to EASILY and cheaply stay super warm at any temperature without running any devices.

We have never had ANY CONDENSATION even though the inside of the van is bare sheet metal - see the sleeping chapter in the Vanabode book for details.

As for HOT muggy climates like Jamaica or even Florida where we are living now (winter months just ending) I do NOT recommend Vanaboding during the rainy summer months because you sweat all the time. Who wants to sweat while they sleep? If it is over 75 degrees at night I move north. Period. Never had ANY condensation problems.

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Thom
I was thinking about using one of the spray insulation used in homes that doesn't have harmful vapors to insulate the cargo area, prevent condensation, and increase the sound deadening. What are your thoughts?
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journeyman

Forget it. Not worth the time or hassle. When traveling you will want to HEAR what is going on outside your Vanabode, be it the beautiful sounds of nature or someone walking up to visit while parked in a new neighborhood.

Extra insulation just gets hot or cold when you are gone and then it takes that much longer when you get back to get the temperature where you want it. Added insulation also takes up more room, is a carcinogen, costs money, and can be squeaky.

Just outfit the interior as shown in the Vanabode book and you will have an easy time of it.

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